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  1. #1
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    Default Low disk space - Vista HP Pavilion Notebook

    My HP Pavilion notebook has 2 disk drives, C & D. My D drive is where I keep all of my files; no programs, system files, etc. are kept there. Suddenly I seem to be "leaking" memory.

    The D drive is 111 gig. Including hidden files, I currently have only 3 folders on it containing 2.8 GB, 275 MB, and 2.82 GB respectively. Yet I supposedly have only 13.5 MB available??

    This has been happening rapidly. Last night in an effort to fix it, I removed a 33 GB file. After defragging I supposedly had 37 GB available. A few hours later, I'm down to 13.5 MB after doing essentially nothing on that drive (a couple of very small new files).

    I ran checkdisk on it tonight and there are no errors or bad sectors.

    This is not my C drive, so system restore points, the recycle bin, the page file, and all the other probable culprits do not come into play here. Spyware Doctor runs regularly so this does not appear to be a virus. I'm tearing my hair out. Please help!
    Last edited by intenseatpon; 05-04-2009 at 03:54 AM. Reason: additional info

  2. #2
    Moderator Forum Moderator arraknid's Avatar
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    This is the old Vista Shadow Copy problem. It's all down to a 'good idea' that someone in Microsoft had, though probably after a night on the town!! As with most of their ideas the end cost is memory hogging and disk space. It's basically an extension of System Restore, so can't really be turned off, but it can be tweaked to use less disk space.

    The problem is discussed here - as is the solution.

    Just one more comment on you deleting large files on the D drive. Make sure you aren't deleting the recovery data for a Vista reinstall. I've seen that done a few times!

  3. #3
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    Thanks, arraknid. However, since this isn't my system disk, Restore Points can't be the problem (not stored there). Besides, I'd already run the Disk Cleanup, which gives the option to delete old restore points.

    Any other ideas? I ran another virus scan on my D drive again this AM, and it's clean.

  4. #4
    Moderator Forum Moderator arraknid's Avatar
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    It makes no difference whether it's a system disk or not. Each drive/partition holds its own restore points. If you go to your System Restore setup, you'll probably find D: drive is selected also, so it's creating backup after backup of a data partition. As I said previously, that may well be the system recovery data. Just deselect it.

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    OMG, you're right!! When I ran the disk cleanup on the D drive, deleting the old restore points wasn't an option (as it was on the C drive cleanup), but when I went to "more options", there it was.

    And instead of using up only 10, 20, 30 GB, as it has on everyone else's postings I read - it was using up 110 GB!! I didn't think it was possible to eat up THAT much space just with restore points.

    Thank you thank you thank you!!

    Karen

  6. #6
    Moderator Forum Moderator arraknid's Avatar
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    You're welcome.

  7. #7
    Moderator Forum Moderator arraknid's Avatar
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    Just as an afterthought, make sure you disable System Restore on your D drive. If you don't, the problem will repeat itself in a few weeks.

    Click on Start, Control Panel, System and Maintenance, System, System Protection and uncheck your D drive.