Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 24

Thread: Power Surge

  1. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    cornwall, new york
    Posts
    176
    Points
    0

    Default

    Did a yahoo search. Any one company better than the other for the caddy?

  2. #12
    Member MrDarn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    South East Northumberland
    Posts
    2,949
    Points
    557

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kmailler View Post
    What is a caddy (besides someone to carry my golf clubs LOL) a unit that you fasten the HD into then USB comes out of it to my laptop?
    Thats exactly what it is.

    As for where to get one, my first choice would be Ebay, unless you can buy a cheeper one elswhere.

    Just remember, there are 2 sizes as well as 2 interfaces,

    There is 2.5inch for laptop drives, and 3.5 inch for desktop drives.

    Interface wise there is either SATA or IDE.
    Always remember you're unique.


    ...Just like everyone else!
    If your problem is solved, here's how to say thanks!

    Windows XP
    Windows Vista
    Windows 7

  3. #13
    Moderator Forum Moderator arraknid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    France
    Posts
    6,151
    Points
    1293
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    Not really, even the cheapest work well. Here's a good selection. Newegg.com - Computer Hardware,Computer Accessories,External Enclosures,3.5"

    You just need to make sure that you choose the correct one, PATA OR SATA. Check out this post from yesterday.

    Data retrievel

  4. #14
    Member whitenoiz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    El Turro, Granada, Spain
    Posts
    160
    Points
    5

    Default

    As your problem was caused by a 'standard' voltage surge, you may be OK replacing the PSU. Then you can begin to test the rest. Good luck.
    Would have to agree with arraknid on this one.

    We live in a very rural area where brownouts and power cuts are a regular occurrence. My wife's computer took a hit via a surge suppressed supply and the results were very similar to those you describe. The surge suppressor blew up with a bang and mucho smoke and when things had settled down I tried the computer and nada...zilch...a quick delve inside the unit revealed a blown PSU.
    I would suspect that Dell like all the other computer manufacturers use a PSU which is only just capable of handling the full load of the computer; almost certainly it will be to an ATX spec and probably rated at no more than 250 watts.
    I had a word with my local guru and he advised uprating to at least twice that value so I fitted a replacement which is form, fit and function the same as the one I removed except it is rated at 500 watts. Given that as a result of the brownout my wife lost a lot of the work she had been doing, at the time we took the opportunity to fit a 500W UPS in place of the surge suppressor. It handles all of the voltage variations we experience.
    The UPS is connected to a raw 230V supply and drives the computer, the router and the monitor. In the event of a power failure or a browndown that doesn't immediately recover she has time to shut down the computer normally without loss of work.
    Strangely enough, my unprotected Acer Tower took a hit sometime later and again took out the PSU. I have fitted an uprated 450w PSU in its place.
    Mmmmm thinks......Must get round to buying a UPS for this one too....when we have a bit of spare cash...actually they don't have to cost a fortune; Belkin have them from around 85 Euros over here, about 100USD. Work on around 350W for the computer, 100W for the monitor and 10W for the router; so you need a minimum of say 500W. This will power the system in the event of a power cut for around 7-8 minutes, long enough to see whether the power is going to come back on and if not you can shut the system down normally.

    Hope this helps...

    whitenoiz
    Last edited by whitenoiz; 06-09-2010 at 05:44 PM.

  5. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    cornwall, new york
    Posts
    176
    Points
    0

    Default

    Worst part here is our electric company takes no blame for anything. Any time you pursue with them it's an "act of GOD" Now they want to back bill all of us for the damage from the blizzard in February. I hope the public service commission tells them it's an "act of GOD" as well.

    My power supply is 250 watts. Are all power supplies one and the same where I can purchase a larger watt PS that would be compatible with the Dell?

  6. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    cornwall, new york
    Posts
    176
    Points
    0

    Default

    whitenoiz,

    does your unit cover power drains, then surges and give you enough time to get everything shut off? Worst part is everything that got hit was off, just the plugs were in (unfortunately). What happened was the power was dimming, dimming, then off and on then finally off. So much for the fuses they put on the lines to blow and prevent this!!!!! I've also read there are units that go in front of your electric panel that will protect your whole breaker box.

  7. #17
    Moderator Forum Moderator arraknid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    France
    Posts
    6,151
    Points
    1293
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    There are large capacity, commercial versions of the home surge protector which sit between the incoming supply and the distribution board, but they aren't cheap. That said, if your insurance doesn't cover your losses, it may be cheaper in the long run. Call your local electical contractor for advice and price.

    As far as the Dell PSU goes, like their motherboards, they are non-standard, so any old ATX PSU won't work! There are some available if you look hard, even some adaptors, but you may end up giving Dell your money. As for size, consider 400W and above.

  8. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    cornwall, new york
    Posts
    176
    Points
    0

    Default

    they were basically telling me just 250 watt on that power supply, but I'll check their site a little more. My agent raised the roof with our insurance company so they will be looking at everything now in our claim. I'm not sure if this means they're taking the computer if they pay but, if they do, it will be minus a hard drive. If I can salvage that, I'm set, not that I really need anything on it, I've got back up on my notebook.

  9. #19
    Moderator Forum Moderator arraknid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    France
    Posts
    6,151
    Points
    1293
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    they were basically telling me just 250 watt on that power supply
    That'll be the direct replacement for your machine as it was sold, but all DELL PSU's I've ever seen have the same connections, so a later model should fit OK.

  10. #20
    Member whitenoiz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    El Turro, Granada, Spain
    Posts
    160
    Points
    5

    Default

    There are large capacity, commercial versions of the home surge protector which sit between the incoming supply and the distribution board, but they aren't cheap.
    And indeed there are; under Spanish Law all new domestic installations must be so equipped before an electricity contract can be issued. My domestic supply was installed in 2006 under what is termed a builders contract. When that contract expired in 2009 I approached my supply company for a normal domestic contract; their inspection revealed a number of fail items under laws introduced between 2006 and 2009. It cost me just short of 1000 Euros, 1200 USD to have the necessary additional items installed and circuit modifications carried out in order to set up the new contract.

    does your unit cover power drains, then surges and give you enough time to get everything shut off?
    Yes; The UPS effectively isolates the PC from the incoming raw mains voltage.

    Worst part is everything that got hit was off, just the plugs were in (unfortunately).
    Problem is that when you go through the normal shutdown procedure when turning off the PC, the PSU itself remains switched on even after everything shuts down, unless you manually operate the mains switch on the PSU. It is thus subject to any spikes, brown-downs or cuts.

    Its a situation we are well used to out here in the wilds!

    Cant add much more other than to repeat my original suggestion that a 250W PSU is barely adequate. The manufactures know this; its a guaranteed way of keeping up their income. It's built-in obsolescence.

    whitenoiz

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast