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  1. #1
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    Exclamation At wit's end - 100% cpu in normal, fine in safe mode

    I'm completely at a loss here. I've no idea what to do, how to fix this, or what could even be causing the issue. I'll go into as much detail as possible.

    Not too long ago, we had a power outage. I continued to work on my laptop while the power was out, hoping that it would come back on before my battery was drained. No such luck. In fact, it seemed that my laptop shut off when there was still greater than 10% on the battery, though I do not know why. I did not attempt to turn it back on, however, but shortly afterwards, the power came back on.

    When I attempted to boot my laptop, everything seemed to work as normal through the boot process, though it seemed to take a bit longer than normal. Then I attempted opening a program 5 minutes after the boot. It took a long while for the program to even open. I opened up task manager and saw that my CPU was running at 100%, and the primary cause was svchost.exe, the one responsible for network services. Along with it, dwm.exe was running fairly high, as was task manager.

    Immediately suspecting spyware or virus, I shut down and rebooted into safe mode with networking since opening anything in its current state was near impossible. I ran SuperAntiSpyware, Microsoft Security Essentials, Malwarebytes, ZoneAlarm's Extreme Suite, Spybot Search & Destroy, and adware was found, which was promptly deleted. Ran them a couple times more to be sure. No viruses to be found, adware completely free. I attempted to reboot into normal mode. Same issue. Back into safe mode with networking. I uninstalled some recent programs with Revo Uninstaller, thinking one of them might be the culprit. Negative. I scanned the hard drive for errors. No errors. I did registry scans and fixed what was found (missing shortcuts, primarily).

    I have a friend who works for Best Buy. He brought over his copy of the Geek Squad Fix-it disk. We ran that, which ran Kapersky, Trend, Panda, Spybot, Webroot - found 24 problems, fixed. I've gone through MSConfig and tried to start up with minimal services and programs. None of this has solved my problem. I've even created a separate user account under the advice of a friend in case I had a corrupted user profile. The problem exists there, too.

    My earliest system restore date happens to be the day after I started having troubles, so that's not going to help. I do not have a recovery disk, nor a recovery partition, so I cannot start up in Repair mode. I do not have an install disk, so I cannot re-install Windows. Every last conceivable thing I can think of in regards to repairing this myself with available tools, I've done. Maybe I'm missing something, I don't know. All I know is that I'm missing out on work because my laptop isn't the best.

    And please don't suggest buying a recovery disk. If I had the money, that would have been my first thought. Any suggestions to what I can do? Here's the specs of the laptop.

    Hewlett-Packard
    Windows 7 Home Version, build 7601, SP1
    Celeron CPU 2.2GHz
    2GB RAM

    Thank you.
    Windows 7 Ultimate Enterprise (Desktop & Laptop)
    Dell Inspiron 1501 (Laptop), Emachines (Desktop)
    AMD Turion 64 X2 Mobile Technology TL-60 2.00GHz (Laptop), Intel Celeron 2.0Ghz (Desktop)
    2GB RAM (Both)
    80GB HDD (Laptop), 160GB & 80GB HDD (Desktop)
    Nvideo GeForce 256MB RAM (Desktop)
    Latest Firefox Browser (Including Beta) (Both)

  2. #2
    Member Spyware Fighter
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    Hello,

    You can burn a repair disc from Windows 7.


    We need to create a Windows 7 System Repair Disk. Note that this disk can only be used to access the Recovery Environment, not to reinstall Windows 7.
    • Press Windows Key + R, type recdisc.exe in the runbox and press enter.
    • If you get a UAC prompt, allow the application to run by clicking Yes. You will see the following:

    • Make sure you have a blank CD or DVD in your CD/DVD drive and click Create disc. Note: If AutoPlay comes up, just close it.
    • When the System Repair Disk has been created, click Close and then OK. Your System Repair Disk is now ready for use.
    " Extinguishing Malware from the world"

    The Spware Help forum is very busy. If I'm helping you and I've not posted back within 24 hrs., send a PM with your topic link. Thank you.
    HELP REQUESTS VIA THE PM SYSTEM WILL BE IGNORED. The Forums are there for a reason!
    Thanks-




  3. #3
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    Unfortunately, that seems to not be an option for me. I'm trying to do it in Safe mode, but it keeps kicking out "Parameter is not correct" errors. Nothing I do works with that error, either. I can't create it in normal mode because again, I can't boot into it.
    Windows 7 Ultimate Enterprise (Desktop & Laptop)
    Dell Inspiron 1501 (Laptop), Emachines (Desktop)
    AMD Turion 64 X2 Mobile Technology TL-60 2.00GHz (Laptop), Intel Celeron 2.0Ghz (Desktop)
    2GB RAM (Both)
    80GB HDD (Laptop), 160GB & 80GB HDD (Desktop)
    Nvideo GeForce 256MB RAM (Desktop)
    Latest Firefox Browser (Including Beta) (Both)

  4. #4
    Member MrDarn's Avatar
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    I see its an HP machine.

    I also see you have tried all the basic measures. Good job so far!

    i have found the following on my travels, i hope it helps you:

    Using System Recovery, Factory Reset and Minimized Image Recovery Options - HP technical support (United Kingdom - English)

    I've highlighted the part that may help below

    Just in case the link fails in the future, this is the Gist:

    Using System Recovery, Factory Reset and Minimized Image Recovery Options
    The HP Recovery Manager application, installed on the hard drive of HP Notebook PCs, can be used to recover the computer to its original operating condition, and can create a set of personalized Recovery discs. In the event of a system failure, you can use either the Recovery Manager or the Recovery discs to re-install your notebook's original operating system and software.

    Depending on when the model was released, the Recovery Manager installed on your notebook was developed by either SoftThink or CyberLink, or by an HP team. The screens may be slightly different, and there may be up to three very different types of recovery options available for your model.

    The System Recovery option does the following:

    Reformats the system drive. The system drive is the hard drive where the current operating is installed (such as the C: drive).

    Re-installs the original operating system on the system drive.

    Re-installs all original hardware drivers.

    Re-installs all original trial software.

    Does not remove or disrupt any user created partitions.
    In some cases, the System Recovery process may require more hard drive space that the system drive actually has. If the system drive is part of a partitioned hard drive, one or more partitions may be de-partitioned to give the System Recovery process the space it requires. Otherwise, user-created partitions will remain intact.

    The Factory Reset option does the following:

    Removes all partitions.

    Reformats all hard drives.

    Re-installs the original operating system on the default system drive (usually the C: drive).

    Re-installs all original hardware drivers.

    Re-installs all original trial software.
    This recovery option returns all of the notebook's software to the condition it was in at the time of purchase. Any programs you installed after purchase and any files you created will be removed entirely.


    Minimized Image Recovery does the following:

    Re-installs the original operating system.

    Re-installs all original hardware drivers.

    Re-installs HP essential software (i.e., HP Support Assistant, HP Recovery Manager, etc.).

    Does not install trial applications or trial games.
    If there are user-created partitions on the hard drive, the HP Recovery Manager prompts you for permission to remove them or leave them intact.

    Depending on how you launch the Recovery Manager, a different number of recovery options are available. The recovery process can take from 30 minutes to two or more hours to complete. The computer will appear to stop working for long periods of time and will then restart several times. Do not interupt the process, nor attempt to use the computer, until you are prompted to logon to the computer with a specifc user name and password.
    To launch the HP Recovery Manager, do any of the following:
    WARNING:
    Because there are several recovery options available, some of which automatically delete files and programs, HP recommends that before you select any recovery option you should back up all important files. Once the recovery process begins deleting files there is no way to pause or stop the action.

    Click Start , type recovery in the search field, and select HP Recovery Manager to run recovery from the D drive.

    Turn on power and press F11 key to run recovery without booting onto Windows (on some models esc key and then F11 key ).


    Insert user-created Recovery disc in disc drive and turn on power to boot from the DVD disc.

    Insert replacement Recovery disc purchased from HP, and turn on power to boot from the DVD disc.
    Always remember you're unique.


    ...Just like everyone else!
    If your problem is solved, here's how to say thanks!

    Windows XP
    Windows Vista
    Windows 7

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  6. #5
    Member asoonernurse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by charneus View Post
    Unfortunately, that seems to not be an option for me. I'm trying to do it in Safe mode, but it keeps kicking out "Parameter is not correct" errors. Nothing I do works with that error, either. I can't create it in normal mode because again, I can't boot into it.
    Do you have a friend or family member who you could burn a repair disc from their machine? It doesn't have to be from your machine.

  7. #6
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    I wound up getting a repair disc, and it failed to fix anything. So, I convinced my friend at Best Buy to get me a Windows 7 Home Basic disc. I reinstalled windows, then upgraded to my current Premium one (thank God for the key being on the bottom of my laptop!). All is well now, except I have to reinstall my network controller and printer stuff. Not a problem, really. Just annoying. Thanks, guys!
    Windows 7 Ultimate Enterprise (Desktop & Laptop)
    Dell Inspiron 1501 (Laptop), Emachines (Desktop)
    AMD Turion 64 X2 Mobile Technology TL-60 2.00GHz (Laptop), Intel Celeron 2.0Ghz (Desktop)
    2GB RAM (Both)
    80GB HDD (Laptop), 160GB & 80GB HDD (Desktop)
    Nvideo GeForce 256MB RAM (Desktop)
    Latest Firefox Browser (Including Beta) (Both)

  8. #7
    Member asoonernurse's Avatar
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    We are all glad it worked out for you, Charneus. And we were happy to troubleshoot with you, lending our advice as best we could. Good luck!

    -Michael