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  1. #1
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    Default My computer died

    I came home 2 nights ago and my computer HP 6530 was dead. I had been getting the F2 system fan failure for a while now but it seemed to still be working fine. I unplugged it for a while then plugged it back in but all that happened was my power button lit up after it sat for a little while but that's it. I bought a new power supply, cpu fan and case fan and replaced them today, now the power comes on and the cpu and case fan run for a few seconds then shut off and nothing loads, all the monitor says is no signal. Did I kill my computer or is there something I missed???

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    Member Spyware Fighter zep516's Avatar
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    Hi

    Welcome to Help2Go

    getting the F2 system fan failure for a while now but it seemed to still be working fine.
    It's possible the Central Processor was damaged by heat from the "System Fan Failure" When a processor gets to hot the computer will or "should" shut down in an attempt to prevent further damage to the processor. The symptoms your getting now "Shut Down" indicate a heat problem still" Is the processor Fan that you replaced spinning? If it is I'm going to guess that there may indeed be processor damage, especially if the system fan has had issues and you continued to use the computer causing the processor to overheat excessively resulting in damage to it.

    Make sure everything is disconnected from the computer, except keyboard, mouse an monitor, just in case an outside device could be causing an issue, like a printer, camera, flash drive or anything like that and restart the computer.

    Joe

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    I don't see my response in the thred so I guess I'll try again. The cpu and case fan spin for about 5 seconds when I first turn it on but then stop, the powers still running though.

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    When you replaced the PS did you specifically connect the CPU fan to its designated plug

    The CPU fan can only connect to its specific power source which controls the CPU ....it is for CPU protection

    If not the computer will not boot....the other fans have the same type plugs but the CPU is specific

    You did a lot of changing....the fan for the CPU may need thermal paste too

    If you removed the CPU or broke it loose from the thermal paste it could fry the CPU in only a few seconds

    Summary: Check all your PS connections and computer connections too...you may have unintentionally let something dislodge or it could be loose
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    Member Spyware Fighter zep516's Avatar
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    Double check power supply connections is all I can think of for now. Others may have a better idea for you.

    Joe

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    Try unplugging the computer from the back of the case....not the wall....then hold in the start button for about 10 seconds or more then plug it back in and try to boot

    Joe (zep) may be right the CPU may have had heat or current failure
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    Try unplugging the computer from the back of the case....not the wall....then hold in the start button for about 10 seconds or more then plug it back in and try to boot
    Sorry but that is an old wives tale, perhaps coming from the old (very old) AT (not ATX) days when the power switch on the front of the case was directly connected to the AT power supply via a wiring harness that ran from the PSU to front button.

    ATX Form Factor PSUs connect to the motherboard, and the front panel switch simply shorts two pins on the motherboard that make a "momentary circuit" signaling the system to start, or stop, or reset - depending on settings in the BIOS.

    As a "momentary circuit" - the "intelligence" behind the two pins ignores any input from the button - until the button is released and pressed again. In other words, all holding the button down does is make your finger tired. It does NOT drain any residual voltages remaining in any circuit.

    The cpu and case fan spin for about 5 seconds when I first turn it on but then stop, the powers still running though.
    That indicates the PSU is being signaled to turn on, but the fact it immediately goes off suggests a fault is being detected. This could be heat, bad CPU, bad RAM, or something else on the motherboard is bad. I agree with the suggestion to check your TIM (thermal interface material). It should NEVER be re-used and any time you pull the CPU's HSF assembly, you should thoroughly clean the mating surfaces then apply a fresh, new, thin as possible layer of TIM to the CPU die.

    Also note the fans spinning does NOT mean the PSU is cranking the required +12VDC, +5VDC, and +3.3VDC to all rails as required. What are the specs of the new PSU? Note most motherboards today require 2, sometimes 3 direct connections from the PSU. And many graphics cards require an additional 1 or 2 direct connections.
    Bill (AFE7Ret)
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    Heat is the bane of all electronics!
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    I finally gave up and took it iin for repair, I'll let you know who was right thanks for the advice.

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    Member Digerati's Avatar
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    I finally gave up and took it iin for repair
    No shame in that! Sorry we could not be of further help. As a technician, I know it is some times necessary to have physical possession of the computer to really figure out what is wrong with it. Then it is usually a simple process to fix it.
    Bill (AFE7Ret)
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    Heat is the bane of all electronics!
    MS MVP, 2007 - 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by Digerati View Post
    No shame in that! Sorry we could not be of further help. As a technician, I know it is some times necessary to have physical possession of the computer to really figure out what is wrong with it. Then it is usually a simple process to fix it.
    The repair guys called and said the motherboard was bad, $120.00 to replace it that includes labor. I'm not sure if that's a good price or not I'm just glad I don't have to replace the computer.

    Thank you to all who answered!!

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