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  1. #1
    Member whitenoiz's Avatar
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    Default Acer M1600 Tower CPU Cooling...

    My main computer is an Acer M1600 which utilises an Intel Pentium 4 D925 CPU. The CPU heatsink is held in place by 4 spring loaded screws which screw into an X shaped metal baseplate mounted to the rear of the motherboard. Its high summer here in Granada with daily ambient temps in excess of 40C and after a few thermally triggered computer shut downs I decided to upgrade the heatsink and cooling fan assembly.

    Arctic Cooling's Freezer 7 Pro. Rev 2 heatsink and fan assembly is supposedly a retrofit for the original item since the intended applications include the 775 type socket which is compatible with the D925 CPU. It should be a straightforward operation but I've fallen at the first hurdle...

    The mounting plate for the new item requires that the original metal backplate be removed from the Mobo. The now redundant backplate appears to float ie., no obvious means of retention to the Mobo... to my simple mind it should just push out of the Mobo leaving the holes for the the fiment of the new heatsink mounting plate but it doesn't, something appears to be holding it in place...

    I've jury rigged the new fan to the original heatsink as a temporary measure but its far from satifactory. Cant go back to the original fan because it has now seized...

    Has anyone any ideas of how the original baseplate is retained. Ive been in touch with Acer and Arctic Cooling but so far have had no response...

    Thanks...
    John.

  2. #2
    Member Digerati's Avatar
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    Default

    and after a few thermally triggered computer shut downs I decided to upgrade the heatsink and cooling fan assembly.
    I wish you came here BEFORE doing this. It is critical to remember it is the case's responsibility to ensure an adequate supply of cool air is flowing through the case. The CPU HSF assembly need only toss the CPU's heat up into that flow - which, in spite of what some "ill-advised" folks may tell you , OEM HSF assemblies are fully capable of doing, even with mild to moderate overclocking.

    If you had come here first, I would have advised that you (1) ensure the interior, including fans, heatsinks and vents were clean of heat trapping dust, (2) to inspect the case's fan support capabilities and consider adding additional case fans, or replace the existing fans with larger fans or higher capacity (more CFM) fans if your case does not support larger (120mm or bigger) fans. And (3), I would have advised you use a hardware monitoring program like CoreTemp or SpeedFan to actually measure your temps. Understand, an overheated chipset, graphics, or RAM module can cause "thermally triggered" shutdowns too!

    Sadly, you've told us nothing about your computer temps. Yes, "ambient" temps of 40C (104F) are high - but without enough "flow" of air through the case to extract the heat generated inside, it matters little what CPU HSF you have. And is that your room temperature, or the temperature outdoors?

    Without air conditioning in the room, it may be necessary to only use the computer in the cooler parts of the day, and/or to remove the side panel and blast a desk fan in there.

    Did you (1) thoroughly clean the CPU die of old TIM (thermal interface material) and did you (2) properly apply a new, fresh layer of TIM? A proper layer is as thin as possible as it need only fill the microscopic pits and valleys in the mating surfaces. Too much TIM is in the way and counterproductive to the efficient heat transfer process.

    Cant go back to the original fan because it has now seized...
    Well, that changes things - but not the requirement for cleaning the CPU die and applying a proper layer of new TIM.

    I have seen plates that attach to the backside of the motherboard, and plates that are held in place when the HSF clamping mechanism is secured. I note a review of that cooler here reports the only con is the "Mediocre fittings". This review might give you some mounting ideas, but if you have damaged the flimsy parts already, you may need to buy a different cooler - and then still upgrade your case cooling.

    And ultimately, if your case does not support better cooling, it may be time to shop for a new case that does offer lots of large fan support so you can achieve the desired front-to-back "flow" of air through the case necessary to extract the heat generated inside.
    Bill (AFE7Ret)
    Freedom is NOT Free!
    Heat is the bane of all electronics!
    MS MVP, 2007 - 2018
    ─────────────────────

  3. #3
    Member whitenoiz's Avatar
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    digerati; thanks for your comments. In view of the fact that the CPU fan seized no doubt due to worn bearings 5 years of 7 days a week 18 hours a day operation, replacing or upgrading the H/S and Fan assembly was the only option. Has to be said though that everything about this entry level computer is suspect; the OEM power supply is rated at only 250w and failed after 15 months, the OEM installed grahics card an ATI Radeon HD2400Pro is fitted with a very flimsy cooling fan, it failed after 18 months of operation. I have since uprated the PSU to 750W and the graphics card to an Nvidia GeForce 220GT. These have been running quite successfuly for the last four years. I keep the computer scrupulously dust free, essential since during the Spanish summer. I routinely run it with the case side panel removed and as you suggest I supplement the case cooling with a deskfan directed into the machine. I didnt post the actual temperatures because I felt they werent really relevant... the CPU fan failed ergo replace it!

    I have however since downloaded via your link the Core Temp program... you need to know that this is not as straightforward as it seems. The program has umpteen unwanted and nasty little addons which have to be deleted, rejected or deselected during the course of the instal. I deleted them all, but one nasty still came down with the download. Its a nasty bit of malware / browser hijacker which redirects ones home page to istartsurf.com Despite deleting it from the 'add and remove programs' section of my Vista Control panel it kept coming back after a reboot. I eventually got rid of it using a combination of Avast, Malwarebytes and Superantispyware; quite which program actually deleted it I dont know each of them pulled up some very recently installed (ie today) nasties.

    (Strangely enough as a matter of course my last job on a Saturday evening is to run malware scans... last night was no different and each of the scans came up with next to nothing... a couple of PUPs and some tracking cookies but no definite threats.)

    As an aside, the temp recorded by Core Temp shows a steady 48C... not bad for a jury rigged cooler. As soon as I can get a definitive answer on the baclplate removal I'll instal the complete new assembly and see how it performs....

  4. #4
    Member Digerati's Avatar
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    The program has umpteen unwanted and nasty little addons which have to be deleted, rejected or deselected during the course of the instal
    Sorry about that. Unfortunately, the developers of these "free" programs need to eat and shelter their families too so they need to generate revenue somehow and add-ons is how they do it. I really don't mind, AS LONG AS they provide a method of opting out - which CoreTemp does.

    However, I should have warned you first.

    That said, your comment about downloading malware with CoreTemp alarmed me! I recommend this monitor a lot and I use it on all my systems. So I used the above link to download and install it again on this, my main computer and I encountered no problems with anything malicious or uninstalled without my knowledge. I got two optional install prompts during the install but they both clearly showed a "Skip" button - which I clicked and those programs did NOT install.

    My MBAM Premium scan found absolutely nothing - no PUPs or anything else unwanted. Neither did any of my other scanners. So I fear you either missed the second prompt, or something else malicious is, or was going on with your system.

    48C is great.
    Bill (AFE7Ret)
    Freedom is NOT Free!
    Heat is the bane of all electronics!
    MS MVP, 2007 - 2018
    ─────────────────────