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Thread: DVD Camcorder

  1. #1
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    Default DVD Camcorder

    Can anyone recommend a good DVD Camcorder? The features i am interested in are easy to use, decent quality, price under £500, record straight to DVD, ability to copy the discs via a pc, compatible with most DVD players, lightweight.

    Thanks

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    Member Help2Go Moderator whoozhe's Avatar
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    It is never easy to recommend cameras. Each user has their preferences.
    The best advice is try them.

    Look at the lens's optical zoom ratio instead of the digital zoom ratio. With a digital zoom, the camcorder is only enlarging the lens's image instead of really giving you a closer look. The optical zoom spec is more important--you'll want at least 10X optical zoom.

    For longer recording times, buy a higher-capacity battery. The battery that comes with most camcorders only lasts an hour or so. For $50 to $100, you can buy a longer-lasting battery, so factor that into your cost if you think you'll need it. (Remember, however, that larger batteries add to the camera's weight.)

    Front-mounted microphones get better results. Top-mounted microphones tend to capture the voice of the person using the camera, and drown out everything else.

    Make sure your camcorder has a place to plug in a seperate microphone

    Try out the camera's controls before you buy. Sometimes the smallest camcorders can be difficult to use, especially if you have large hands. A larger model may work better for you if it's more comfortable to use.

    Low-light options let you shoot in the dark. Many cameras offer an infrared light or long shutter mode to help you capture images in dark settings.

    Know your format. Most camcorders use MiniDV, but other formats are available, such as Digital 8 and MicroMV. Keep in mind that MiniDV is the most widely available--a boon if you find yourself short on tape while on vacation.

    Digital 8 camcorders record on Hi-8 tapes and can also play back videotapes recorded on analog camcorders.

    Don't expect to edit MicroMV tapes using most video-editing programs; you'll have to use an editing program that supports the MicroMV compression format, or convert the tape into a format that the program understands.
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