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Thread: character map

  1. #1
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    Default character map

    Does anyone know why the ASCII character map (using ALT-number code) does not list math symbols/fractions like "one-third," "two-thirds," "one-fifth," etc. beyond ¼, ½, or ¾? Can someone suggest a solution to this problem? I lost the character map months and months ago when I downloaded an anti-spyware/spam program. The windows XP CD that came with my new PC was stolen, and I am not sure whether or not I can filter out the Windows XP character map from the Compaq Recovery CDs I had made. And, although this sounds like fiction, the Windows XP CD that came with my new laptop when I was overseas, was stolen as well, possibly by the same person.
    I very much appreciate your help. Suse
    Please keep instructions very simple. Thanks for your help!

  2. #2
    Administrator Help2Go Administrator Canuck's Avatar
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    Here's a free ASCII character map, all the ones I've come across are the same though with no further fractions. http://www.hi5software.com/ascii.php

  3. #3
    Member Priam's Avatar
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    As far as why other fractions aren't in the character set, well, you have to consider their rate of usage. What good would it do people to clog up the character tables with things like 13/52 and 6/15? Only the most frequently used ones made it into the normal standard character set.

    What you can do, in Word at least, is superscript the numerator, leave the "/" in normal format, and subscript the denominator. It gets pretty close to what you're looking for.

    On the other hand, it is much easier to use the fraction maker in Word. Hit Ctrl-F9, and you should get some bold boxes in gray. Inside the braces, type "eq \f(x,y)" (where x is the numerator and y is the denominator--and without the quotes) and you'll get your fraction. A little dodgy, but if you want to speed up the process and you use the same fractions over and over, you can add an AutoCorrect entry for them. Just highlight your new fraction that you generated with the ctrl-f9, and go to Tools -> AutoCorrect. Your fraction should automatically be in the text entry field, and you can type your trigger phrase (i.e. "2/7"--again, no quotes) in there, et voila.

    For more complex fractions with polynomials and that kind of business, you're going to want to look into a scientific mathematics program. I know they exist, but I cannot remember the name off the top of my head.
    "It's everywhere, in the headlines in the newspapers, in the blurry images on television. It is a secret you have yet to grasp, but the first syllable has been spoken in a dream you cannot quite recall." ---Unknown Armies