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  1. #1
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    Default Your Character map help

    Thank you for replying to my question so promptly. You are wonderful. By the way, the ctrl-F9 brought up nothing at all. But I did find the character map in WORD - INSERT - SPECIAL CHARACTERS. And after reading how to superscript and subscript I now have that choice available as well. Also downloaded the ASCII map you referred to. I guess I am all charactered out now. Suse
    Please keep instructions very simple. Thanks for your help!

  2. #2
    Member Priam's Avatar
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    Not a problem. If you'd like to know more about character mappings, then there's an even more greatly expanded character set called Unicode that is fairly standardized, and receives some updates per need. You can see what's laid out in the code here: http://www.unicode.org/charts/ --and there's a lot more information on the subject elsewhere on the site if you're interested.

    Looking at that, I can see there are significantly more fractions ( http://www.unicode.org/charts/PDF/U2150.pdf ) in the Unicode character set, but they are decidedly more difficult to use, and the method for so appears to change a little from program to program. To much shame, the Unicode official website doesn't seem to want to give any information on HOW to use Unicode.

    Actually, this: http://everything2.com/index.pl?node...code%20on%20E2 is a pretty good resource for learning practical information about Unicode. Give it a once-over.

    As far as the fraction-maker in Word, here's an alternate method: Go to the Insert menu, and click "Field..." Then, inside the little text box towards the bottom of that dialog box, take out the = sign that is already there, and put in your "eq \f(#,#)" code, and click OK. You can use this to fractionate numbers, words, phrases, whatever you want. Just be sure you close the parentheses at the end, and use a comma in between your numerator and denominator.
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